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August 25, 2012, Sunday afternoon, when i found out that my son got skin rashes. My husband and I thought,  it was only ordinary skin rashes, and thinking he was only bit by a dust mite. However, in the evening of the said date, i felt that he was not feeling okay. When i touched him, i knew  he had a slight fever. So, I immediately gave him Paracetamol. So i was thinking  it was just like that. But in the next morning, i noticed that my son's skin rashes got worst. I was so scared because his whole body had been covered by so many skin red-rashes. Started only on his arms, then on his face had it too. My mother told me that it was just an allergy, but i felt it wasn't.  Why? because he had a low grade fever, (38.4'C) and he could not also walk. I really thought and my parents also thought, it was probably Tigdas Hangin or measles.

Then, the next morning, we went to his Pedia for us to be sure what's transpiring on our baby's skin. His pediatrician informed us that it's Urticaria or Tagulabay in Tagalog. And she said, there was nothing to worry about. She explained it to us. So, I felt really relieved on the findings. She gave us some medications to control the rashes. It's more on Antihistamine. Those medicines are Cetirizine Dihydrochloride and Hydroxyzine Dihydrochloride.

When we came home, i outright gave my son a dose of his medicine. After a day, he got better and the rashes was lessened and he felt well rather than before.

He is okay now and, he is so playful again. No more worries for us. Thank God!


What is Urticaria (Hives) or Tagulabay?

An itchy skin eruption characterized by weals with pale interiors and well-defined red margins; usually the result of an allergic response to insect bites, food or drugs

Types of URTICARIA
  • Acute UrticariaIt usually show up a few minutes after contact with the allergen and can last a few hours to several weeks. Food allergic reactions often fit in this category. The most common food allergies in adults are shellfish and nuts. The most common food allergies in children are shellfish, nuts, peanuts, eggs, wheat, and soy. It is uncommon for patients to have more than 2 true food allergies. A less common cause is exposure to certain bacteria, such as streptococcus or possibly Helicobacter pylori. In these cases, the hives may be exacerbated by other factors.
  • Chronic urticaria  -  It refers to hives that persists for 6 weeks or more. There are no visual differences between acute and chronic urticaria. Some of the more severe chronic cases have lasted more than 20 years. A survey indicated that chronic urticaria lasted a year or more in more than 50% of sufferers and 20 years or more in 20% of them. Of course this does mean that in almost half the people it clears up within a year and in 80% it clears up within 20 years or less.
  • Drug-induced urticaria  -  It has been known to result in severe cardiorespiratory failure. The anti-diabetic sulphonylurea glimepiride (trade name Amaryl), in particular, has been documented to induce allergic reactions manifesting as urticaria. Other cases include dextroamphetamine, aspirin, penicillin, clotrimazole, sulfonamides and anticonvulsants.
  • Physical urticarias  -  They are often categorized into the following:

    Aquagenic: Reaction to water (exceedingly rare)
    Cholinergic: Reaction to body heat, such as when exercising or after a hot shower
    Cold (Chronic cold urticaria): Reaction to cold, such as ice, cold air or water - worse with sudden change in temperature
    Delayed Pressure: Reaction to standing for long periods, bra-straps, elastic bands on undergarments, belts
    Dermatographic: Reaction when skin is scratched (very common)
    Heat: Reaction to hot food or objects (rare)
    Solar: Reaction to direct sunlight (rare, though more common in those with fair skin)
    Vibration: Reaction to vibration (rare)
    Adrenergic: Reaction to adrenaline / noradrenaline (extremely rare).
                                               Source: http://health.hpathy.com/Urticaria-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp  / www.wikipedia.com

Symptoms of Hives (Urticaria) or Tagulabay

Ordinary hives flare up suddenly and usually for no specific reason. Welts appear, often in several places. They flare, itch, swell, and go away in a matter of minutes to hours, only to appear elsewhere. This sequence may go on from days to weeks. Most episodes of hives last less than six weeks. Although that cutoff point is arbitrary, hives that last more than six weeks are often called "chronic."

Causes of Hives (Urticaria) or Tagulabay

Many cases of ordinary hives are "idiopathic," meaning no cause is known. Others may be triggered by viral infections. A few may be caused by medications, usually when they have been taken for the first time a few weeks before. (It is uncommon for drugs taken continuously for long periods to cause hives or other reactions.) When a medication is implicated as a cause of hives, the drug must be stopped, since no skin or blood test will prove the connection. In most cases, drug-induced hives will go away in a few days. If a drug is stopped and the hives do not go away, this is a strong indication that the medication was not in fact the cause of the hives. Some medications, like morphine, codeine, aspirin, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen [Advil]), cause the body to release histamine and produce urticaria through nonallergic mechanisms.

Despite the reputation of hives being an "allergic" condition, there is characteristically no obvious connection to a provoking substance. In this situation, allergy testing is not usually helpful.

                                                              Source: http://www.urticariatreatments.net/cholirgenic-urticaria/

Treatments for Hives (Urticaria) or Tagulabay

When my son acquired hives, his pediatrician advised him to take some antihistamine medications such as  diphenhydramine or with other sedating medicines, which contains Hydroxyzine Dihydrochloride.

Well, i thought, when you have hives or tagulabay, you must not be able to take a bath. I was dead wrong, most of the doctors / pediatricians really recommend to give a bath to a person suffering from it. Because, it is so important that you clean your body -- personal hygiene is properly advised. And also, try to avoid whatever is causing it.

For the patient suffering from it, it is best to consult your doctor for further proper treatments to cure and to avoid it.




 


Comments

jackie
12/26/2013 12:52pm

i have tagulabay for morethan a week and it so itchy i cnt sleep,i cnt go out or even wear shorts in the house.i am not allowed to drink any medicine because of my condition im on my 9 weeks pregnancy.anyone could help me to dissapear my tagulabay?

Reply
kadz28
01/13/2014 8:38am

Try the oatmeal bath.. it helps lessen the itch..

Reply
Ian G
01/21/2014 4:10pm

I researched for the causes of urticaria . One of them is having (sirang ngipin) because of the infection it gives

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